Learn How To Make a Knife: Knifemaking Tuesdays Sponsored By Tormach

  • KMT 119 - Erik learns the Tormach Lathe

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    In this KMT vid I get to teach Erik the basics of running the Tormach lathe, how to use Gwizard to find the proper speeds and feeds, and how to write a quick program in Path Pilot conversational mode. We're shortening some hardened steel dowel pins. There were a few hiccups and learning mistakes along the way of course but Erik made great progress!

    Thanks for watching!

    KMT 115 - Alaska Knife engraving

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    A few months ago we got to work on a really neat engraving project, In this week's Knife Making Tuesday video we show the entire process from the CAD/CAM in Solidworks/HSMworks to machining it on the Tormach PCNC1100, to anodizing and finishing it. It was a lot of extra work but the end result was totally worth it! Hope you enjoy,
    John

  • KMT 107 - Facing Titanium with indexable endmills

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    This week I have a stack of titanium handles that need to be thinner. Normally I buy 0.156" stock and have a shop waterjet and double disc grind them to 0.125", but I ended up with a bunch of thicker ones this time. It's a showdown between two of Tormach's modular insert tools, the 2 insert square endmill and the 3 insert toroid. I'm also playing with some higher SFM (surface feet per minute) settings and cutting pretty aggressively for titanium. Using an SFM of 470 lead to rapid edge wear, but turning it down to 250 made the inserts last a long time!

    Enjoy the video, please comment if you have any questions or suggestions!

    The two Tormach tools used here are:
    http://www.tormach.com/store/index.php?app=ecom&ns=catshow&ref=multicat_modinsert_endmillcc_25mm
    http://www.tormach.com/store/index.php?app=ecom&ns=catshow&ref=multicat_modinsert_toroidal_25mm

    Thanks for watching!
    www.GrimsmoKnives.com
    https://instagram.com/johngrimsmoknives/
    https://instagram.com/erik_grimsmoknives/

    KMT 106 - Etching Damasteel knife blades with muriatic acid

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    Damasteel is a powdered metallurgy stainless damascus steel. It is AWESOME. In this video we show our new and improved process on how to etch the steel after heat treat to bring out that beautiful pattern.

    In our last etching video, linked below, we ended up using ferric chloride and then sulfuric acid, which didn't give the best results. Now we're using muriatic acid and loving it. Erik takes the lead with this video because it's his specialty, he shows how to clean the blades, prepare them for etching, etch them, neutralize them, polish after etching, and a lot of other little tricks in between.

    Our first Etching Damasteel video:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inzrn7kL-2U

    Here is more information about Damasteel and where to order it from. It's expensive, but amazing. It truly is one of the best, if not the best, stainless damascus steel in the world. And that's why we use it!
    http://damasteel.se/

  • KMT 105 - Damasteel part 2 - machining blades

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    In part 2 of this Damasteel series I machine the blades, specifically the corner round and the bevels on the edge. I also do a neat little custom engraving on one of them. There are lots of little fixturing tips and tricks throughout this video, as well as some info on the button insert toroid endmill that I use. In the end I show off a finished knife with a fully etched blade and a closeup of that custom engraving. It turned out great! I love using Damasteel, even though it can be time consuming to work with. The results are completely worth it!

    Thanks for watching!
    www.GrimsmoKnives.com
    https://instagram.com/johngrimsmoknives/
    https://instagram.com/erik_grimsmoknives/

    KMT 104 - Damasteel part 1 - cutting out blades

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    I've got a long one for you this week! Get your popcorn ready. Here I am taking some new sheets of Damasteel (damascus steel) and cutting them out of the sheets into blanks that I can then CNC machine into my knife blades. I go over the entire process, from how to nest the parts within the sheet, how to use Solidworks and HSMWorks to design the pattern and write the CNC code, then I use the Mitee Bite Vac Magic to suction the parts down to the table of my Tormach PCNC1100 CNC milling machine. Then I proceed to break about 5-10 endmills haha. Luckily I did not ruin any of the blades, it just caused a lot of headaches for me. Next time I will get these blades waterjet cut, this was a long long process that I do not need to do myself every single time.

    I talked about Instagram in the vid, here is the direct website link to our Instagram accounts if you're not into the whole smartphone thing.
    https://instagram.com/johngrimsmoknives
    https://instagram.com/erik_grimsmoknives

    Thanks for watching!!!

  • KMT 102 - Titanium LBS screws on the Tormach Lathe

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    Here I show how I make my lock bar stabilizer screws for our knives using the new Tormach 15L Slant Pro lathe. We start by turning on the lathe, talk about warmup procedures, do some test cuts to dial in the machine and make sure it is cutting exactly on tolerance, then proceed to machine the part. A lot of people complain about machining titanium but I love it! With sharp tools and halfway decent speeds and feeds it's not that difficult. Or maybe I'm just so used to it.

    Thanks for watching! Be sure to check us out on Instagram too:
    @johngrimsmoknives
    @erik_grimsmoknives

    Grimsmo Knives interview by Edge Factor - Behind The Scenes

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35k6ZZ_jiis
    In December 2014 our friends from Edge Factor came by the shop to interview us and film a bunch of sweet shots in the shop. Here is the behinds the scenes look. It was a wonderful experience having them come by, these guys are THE experts in filming manufacturing, so I learned a lot of skills that I can apply to my own videos. Please go check out their final production version of this interview in the link above.

    www.GrimsmoKnives.com
    Instagram:
    @johngrimsmoknives
    @erik_grimsmoknives

  • Edge Factor: Grimsmo Knives Tour

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    Jeremy Bout and the Edge Factor crew make a stop at Grimsmo Knives to meet with John Grimsmo, owner, knife maker, and entrepreneur.


    Like us, follow us, and subscribe!
    facebook.com/edgefactor
    twitter.com/edgefactorshow
    youtube.com/theedgefactorshow

    KMT 100 - A Day In The Life of Grimsmo Knives

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    100 episodes of Knifemaking Tuesdays!!! I can't believe we've been at it this long. For week 100 we wanted to do something really special, so Erik and I spent an entire day working and filming each other. We got 190 clips of footage and sent it to our awesome video editor. This is the first video we've done like this, and the first one where we used music. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did! Please like, share, and show this video to everyone who would get a kick out of it. 2015 is going to be an amazing year!

    www.GrimsmoKnives.com
    Grimsmo Knives is a small manufacturer of high end custom pocket knives run by "The Brothers Grimsmo" John and Erik. Using only the highest quality materials and as much technology as they can stuff into their small shop, they pour love, passion, and dedication into every knife they make. Follow their journey through the previous Knifemaking Tuesday videos.

    Follow them on Instagram:
    @johngrimsmoknives
    @erik_grimsmoknives

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 98 - Lathe spacers part 1

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    This week we're setting up our new Tormach 15L Slant-Pro lathe to run a batch of spacers. I filmed way too much footage so we had to break it into part 1 and part 2. This one shows how I set up the lathe with all the tools I'm going to require, and goes over how the lathe works and how I like it. The lathe is amazing! As you'll see in the next video, it can hold crazy tolerances and produces perfect parts.

    Setting up gang tools takes some thinking and tinkering, it's tricky sometimes to wrap your head around how and where best to put all the tools. Experience helps, so just try something and improve from there, instead of trying to do it perfect the first time. I had to shim a lot of the tools up because you want them all to be on centerline.

    Thank you all for watching and supporting Knifemaking Tuesdays!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 97 - Enclosure for the Tormach PCNC1100

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    More new toys! We recently installed Tormach's new enclosure kit for the PCNC1100 CNC milling machine. It's awesome! We go over the entire install, including sandblasting and powder coating the original chip trays, installing the kit, and our thoughts on the enclosure. Also thrown in for fun, making sweet turned parts on our Tormach 15L slant bed lathe, putting winter tires on my Volvo, and Erik and I being goofballs.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 96 - Tormach Lathe delivery and installation

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    We recently bought Tormach's new 15L Slant-Pro lathe! This vid shows the delivery, installation, setup, my thoughts so far, as well as a bunch of random machining on the 1100 mill. This lathe is a beast, I love it! Unfortunately I didn't actually film the lathe making parts once it was all set up, but I've got other videos coming up showing that in detail. In the next week or two there should be a good one showing how I make my titanium spacers on it, they turned out amazingly ridiculously perfect!

    I set this lathe up with gang tooling because I'm making lots of tiny parts, it works very very well. If you're making huge things or lots of random things then you're better off getting the quick change tool post, or the eventual turret tool changer once they release it. I might get the turret and still run gang tooling, allowing me to have a LOT of tools on the table. It's a little confusing ordering everything for the lathe because there are so many tooling options. You have to think about the parts that you want to make and buy tooling that will suit those parts.

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 95 - Shorten pivot pins

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    Here I show a new way of fixturing on the Tormach PCNC1100 to help me shorten the pivots on my knives. The ones that I buy are excellent but they're way too long! And since I like things to be as perfect as possible I needed a repeatable way to shorten them all identically. This method allows me to do 12 at once instead of 2 like I was doing before. I'm using Mitee Bite Uniforce clamps to keep them in place, love these little things.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 94 - Dressing the belt drive wheel on the Tormach PSG612

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    This week we're working on the Tormach PSG612 automatic surface grinder again, dressing the rubber wheel so that it provides a better finish. Over time the wheel gets a little bit grooved, just enough to show when we're using really thin belts to do a high polish. So we simply took a lathe tool with a very sharp insert for aluminum and quickly dressed the wheel. We only have to do this every few months, instead of every single time it gets used like for a stone wheel. Enjoy!

    Our new vibratory tumbler broke, lets fix it!

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    One of the coolest things about having all these tools at my disposal is that I can fix pretty much anything, or at least that's what I tell myself haha. We got this new tumbler from Northern Tool 7 months ago and it's been working great, until it didn't, the eccentric shaft snapped in half. Well, not wanting to send the whole thing back or wait for a replacement part, I decided to make a replacement myself... "How hard could it be?". So I fired up my dusty old cnc lathe that I never use anymore and went to work, it was fun! I really miss doing CNC lathe work, it's how I started with CNC so I have a huge soft spot in my heart for it. Once the new parts were made I even got them TIG welded. Seems to work great now. Enjoy!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 93 - Titanium surface grinding with the Tormach PSG

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    The awesome thing about using the Tormach precision surface grinder with the belt attachment is that we can grind pretty much anything! Here we are surfacing a sheet of titanium to get one side perfectly flat and smooth so that it has a really nice surface finish. This will become a whole bunch of pocket clips after a few hours on the PCNC1100, and having the top side of the clips already flat and nice will save Erik a lot of time and effort in the end when he's sanding them all to perfection.

    The PSG612 really shines with a job like this, I absolutely love it.

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 92 - King engraving on clip

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    In this video a customer wanted a unique engraving on his knife somewhere so it was up to me to figure out how to accomplish that. This video goes through the step by step process, with problems and solutions, on how I did the engraving. There are easier ways, but this is just one way that I chose to do. I think it turned out great!


    Sorry about the video quality, we had some converting and rendering issues, it shouldn't happen again.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 91 - Surface Grinding Blade Steel with the Tormach PSG612

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    We're making more Norseman blades this Tuesday so we finally get to show off the new Tormach PSG 612 automatic surface grinder!
    IT. IS. AWESOME!
    We have the prototype belt attachment which makes the grinder even more super duper awesome, they should just sell it like this. In this vid we're surface grinding some of our RWL34 stainless steel blades before any real machining and before heat treating. Only taking off 0.001-0.002" just to get the pits out from the manufacturing process and to make sure that they're perfectly flat and parallel.

    When using belts on a surface grinder like this knifemakers have been known to take off 0.005-0.010" easily, which is CRAZY TALK if you're using a stone wheel. With a wheel you can usually only take off 0.001" MAX, often less than that, we were doing a lot of 0.0002" passes before belts. There is a huge selection of belts available in 1x42" and changing them is fast and easy. It really is the future of surface grinding. With some attention and practice you should be able to hold 0.0002" tolerance with belts just like with stones, but it's way faster. All in all, we're in love with this machine, especially with belts!

    Hope you enjoyed it, more videos to come. We have a vid coming up of surface grinding titanium.

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 90 - Viking head inlay

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    Here's a pretty awesome project I did that I'm very happy with. I got to machine some really tight tolerances in different materials and it worked out great! I made my viking head logo as a two material inlay and I glued it into some titanium knife handles, then sanded it all flat and tumbled it all. The results were amazing. Up until now I've never tried very hard to get an inlay to fit "perfectly" with zero or practically zero gaps, but I nailed it here. The carbon fiber and micarta inlays fit together with zero clearance and they pressed together nicely. They fit into the handles with 0.001" wall clearance. The trick is very accurate tool paths (thanks to HSMWorks) and measuring the actual diameter of the endmills you're using, protip: they're smaller than the stated size! Almost all endmills are like this. My 0.0625" endmills measured out to be around 0.0610", which is a substantial difference when you're trying to make things fit without a gap.

    Thanks for watching, enjoy!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 89 - Handle vacuum fixture

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    I wanted to try a new method to make my titanium Norseman knife handles, since my old method was prone to mistakes. The new way I am having the handles waterjet and double disc ground to make them perfectly flat and the correct thickness, then I'm using a vacuum pallet and some small Mitee Bite clamps to secure the handles in place on the fixture. Works GREAT!

    Norseman Knife Maintenance - cleaning and assembly

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    Erik shows the process of taking one of our knives apart, cleaning it, and using NanoOil to lubricate it during assembly. He's got a few little tips and tricks that you might find useful.

    Some makers claim that you will void the warranty if you take the knife apart. I think that's silly, you should be able to clean and maintain your own tool. Guns are designed this way, you're supposed to know how to tear it down and clean it. I designed the knife to be fairly easy to take apart and go together properly. You'll only void the warranty if you do something stupid with it and break it, and even then I would like to know about it to see if there is something I can do to help fix it.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 88 - Timascus Part 2 - finished knife!

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    This was filmed several months ago and we finally got it finished and edited. Here we continue our project from Week 84 and finish the Timascus knife! We are using a rare pattern of Timascus called the Nordic Twist, the second I heard that name I had to have it and make a Norseman knife from it. Here we show the process of machining the topside of the handles, sanding them to a high polish, heat anodizing the titanium, and of course the finished product. I think it turned out epic!

    Grimsmo Knives August 2014 Update

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    Sorry for my recent absence, this video explains why there haven't been many videos lately. All is good, life is awesome, more videos to come!

    Check out our instagram pages here:
    On your phone:
    @johngrimsmoknives
    @erik_grimsmoknives

    On your computer:
    http://instagram.com/johngrimsmoknives
    http://instagram.com/erik_grimsmoknives

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 87 - textured carbon fiber inlays

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    Up until now all of the inlays on my knives have been smooth, but I've always wanted to try adding a texture to them. It's a winner! This is a herringbone aka chevron pattern, super simple to design and machine since it's just zig zags. The carbon fiber material looks great with the new pattern too, it reflects all the fibers from many different angles producing more depth and appeal.

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 86 - Carbidizing titanium knife locks

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    April Fools! Well, no, not really. Here's another video from the Grimsmo Shop! People have often asked me how I carbidize my titanium handles and I've been meaning to do a video for the past two years.

    It's a fairly straightforward matter of using 40v DC and a dremel engraver to apply a layer of tungsten carbide to the end of the lockbar on titanium framelock knives. This can help to prevent lock sticking and even lengthen the wear time. It's pretty easy to apply, and this this video I show a few tricks that I use to make it go easier and smoother. Enjoy!

  • Tormach coolant screen replacement

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    After owning my Tormach PCNC1100 milling machine for over a year and a half, the coolant drain screen was starting to wear out and needed a replacement. I was able to find a suitable upgrade from Mcmaster and this video shows what it is and how I installed it. The new one works great!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 85 - Wood inlays

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    Thanks to some great comments from previous videos I was finally able to make a good set of wood inlays! The stabilized redwood burl that I was using was so brittle due to the burl, that they would crack and break very very easily, so machining them and removing them from the fixture was a real pain. Others suggested that heating up the fixture will melt the glue bond and let them come off, and it worked! Then I gave them a quick sand with 800 grit, glued them into the knife, then oiled them with mineral oil and they look amazing.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 84 - Timascus Part 1

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    This week I'm finally machining a piece of Timascus that I've had sitting around for over a year. Timascus is a really awesome kind of titanium damascus made by www.alphaknifesupply.com. I'm making a set of Norseman knife handles from it, as well as 2 clips and a whole bunch of thumbstuds. The trick is trying to maximize the material so I'm wasting very little. After some tricky coding on the computer I start machining the handles and show a lot of that. Thankfully the machining was successful with no catastrophic failures!

    Part 2 will include machining the topside of the handles, pocket clips, and thumbstuds.

    Thanks for watching!!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 83 - grinder - making a flat platen

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    For Week 83 we're making a much needed attachment for our new 2x72 belt grinder, a flat platen. This will keep the belt supported flat so that we can sand the flat surfaces of our handles and blades to ensure that they are absolutely dead flat. The platen has sped this operation up and made it much more enjoyable, and consistent, for Erik to work on. Enjoy!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 82 - sharpening and tumbling

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    Erik has a new sharpening method that he's been honing (pun intended) for a few months now. We used to use the Wicked Edge sharpening system but it was too time consuming for our needs, it's great for a few knives, but not for dozens and dozens.

    I also talk a lot about vibratory finishing, which gives the parts a nice even stonewashed appearance. Titanium is fickle when trying to make it look nice and even without being too prone to scratching, stonewashing seems to give us the best finish.

    Thanks for watching!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 81 - 3d printed integral

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    I'm finally showing off my new toy that I got a few months ago. My friend Jake Mestre used his awesome 3d printers to make a prototype knife for me! It's one of my designs that I've had modeled in CAD for over a year now, it's so nice to finally see it and feel it in my hand! 3d printing is awesome! I am not taking orders for this knife because it's still a ways away from production, but progress is being made and I'm having fun with it.

    Enjoy.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 80 - Copper Inlay Awesomeness

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    This week I made a set of copper inlays for one of my newest knives. Machining copper was an interesting challenge, and the results were completely worth it! After breaking a few endmills and searching online I finally found the proper endmills to use, and with flood coolant it machined well. After putting in the dimpled surface with a Lakeshore Carbide 4 flute ballmill, we anodized the handles bronze and acid etched the blade. The finished knife looks incredible, probably the coolest one we've made so far! Let me know what you think, thanks!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 79 - Update and More Straightening Blades

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    This week we give a Norseman progress report for the current batch we're working on, as well as talk about how we are straightening warped blades after they have been heat treated.

  • Norseman Knife Maintenance - Lubrication

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    This video shows a problem that happens with my knives every now and then, the detent ball gets all scratchy and the knife doesn't open properly. A quick drop of lubricant like Tuf Glide and it's all better!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 78 - Straighten blades

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    As winter is setting in and I bust out the sweaters and knitted hats, we're preparing a batch of 122 blades to go to heat treat. They're all a little warped from the machining process so I have to tweak them all straight. Enjoy!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 77 - Grinder Part 4 DONE!

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    The new grinder is finally FINISHED! I first designed it a year ago, then slowly started collecting components and machining small parts, then this last week I started on a Knifemaking Tuesday and ended on Monday, working for an entire week to finish it up. Boy was it worth the effort! I can't believe we waited so long to get or make one, it will make our lives so much easier and save us a good amount of time.

    This video is an overview of the finished grinder, showing all the components that I made, how they all work together, and most importantly, all the parts that I did wrong and would change for next time. To anyone building their own grinder, I hope this series of videos has been helpful!

    S90V and Damasteel Norseman blades

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    Knifemaker Jake Hoback gave me a piece of S90V because he likes using it so much, and I finally got around to machining a Norseman blade from it. It's TOUGH STUFF! Tore up endmills way faster than normal, it was interesting. Not something I want to be machining often, but fun to do from time to time.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 76 Grinder Part 3 final components

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    This week I finally get to make the last few components needed to finish my grinder! Lots of machining aluminum, how to deburr edges using a scraper, and how to tap a threaded hole using a cordless drill! The grinder is coming together nicely, even though it's taken almost an entire year and way too many hours!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 75 - CMTS 2013

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    This Tuesday I attended the Canadian Manufacturing Technology Show. What better way to spend a Knifemaking Tuesday than getting to see the biggest and best equipment out there! Had a blast, talked to so many great companies and learned a lot of cool new tricks to use in my own business. I recommend shows like these to anyone who is interested in machining or manufacturing.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 74 Grinder Part 2

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    I finally got a bunch more progress made on my grinder! This week I made the tilting mechanism and two big side plates, plus got to start mocking the parts together and seeing how they fit and work with each other. It's almost starting to look like a grinder. Almost. Hopefully within another week or two I can have it spinning a belt and make sparks!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 73 pivots, engraving and customizing

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    This week I am modifying some knife pivots from www.AlphaKnifeSupply.com. These ones are 3/16" diameter and made from 416 stainless steel, a very high quality product! They come in a standard "too big" size, so I have to shorten the body and shorten the head, then customize it with my viking head logo. I use aluminum softjaws in my vise to hold the pivots so that I can do several at once.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 72 - knives from 3rd batch

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    This week's video is a compilation of some of our finished knives from the past two months. When they were done I'd snap on the camera and shoot a little clip, then store it for later. It shows a good variety of colors and options that we offer, lots of cool stuff!

    Enjoy guys!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 71 - Materials

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    This week I wanted to go over some of the materials that I work with while making my knives.

    0:55 - Aluminum
    4:47 - Wood
    7:35 - G10
    11:48 - Glow in the dark plastic
    14:05 - Carbon Fiber
    18:27 - Lightning Strike Carbon Fiber
    20:57 - Steel
    23:09 - Stainless Steel
    29:10 - Titanium

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 70 - One Million views shop tour

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    We recently passed 1,000,000 views on our videos! WOOOOOOOOO! For this week's video Erik and John simply walk you around the shop and banter back and forth about shop stuff. We describe some of the current and new projects we're working on, as well as going over some of our tools and new found space in the shop.

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 69 Wicked Edge and fixing handles

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    This week Erik uses some new accessories for his Wicked Edge Sharpening System, including the new arms and new 50/80 grit stones. He also shows how to set up a Norseman knife on the sharpener to achieve the best angle.

    John takes a few raw handles and pairs them together, then shows a few tricks on how to fix various consistency mistakes.

    Thanks for watching!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 68 Bearing Cages

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    This week I show how I make my new bearing cages for the pivots on my knives. Not satisfied with the current solutions on the market, I went ahead and designed my own, mostly for the extra "cool" factor, but they turned out perfect.

    The fixture was probably the hardest part, it's an intricate vacuum fixture using a ton of o-rings that seal the vacuum so that it pulls down the material evenly. I used Nylon sheet that's around 0.047" thick, and with my fixture I can make loads of them in one setup. One of the tricks to machining plastics is using the proper endmills, I settled on some Kyocera single flute endmills for the best surface finish.

    In the end the project consumed a lot of my time, but the results were worth it because the bearings work perfectly. And now that it's all set up and figured out, making more will not be a problem. Thanks for watching!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 67 - Inlays Part 2

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    For part 2 I attempt to make some wood inlays, and later I show how I glue them into the handles.

    I used stabilized redwood burl for these inlays, purchased from www.AlphaKnifeSupply.com. It comes in large-ish blocks that have to be sliced up to make inlays. I don't have a bandsaw so I used a slitting saw on my Tormach to slice them up. Once I had slices I could glue them to my inlay fixture and get milling. This wood was super tricky because it's a burl, there's knots all over. That's part of the allure of burl woods because they look fantastic, but when the inlays are this thin they're just too delicate! Talking with other knifemakers and suppliers they were suggesting other woods like African Blackwood or Ebony, apparently they're a lot stronger.

    At 14:30 I show the glue I used to glue in all my inlays, Loctite 324 and the activator 7075, they work great! Spray the activator on the inlays and squidge the 324 glue into the handle, press them together, 3-5 minutes later it's stuck for life.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 66 - Inlays Part 1

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    In part 1 I show you how I made my carbon fiber and glow in the dark knife handle inlays.

    I started by making an aluminum fixture on my Tormach cnc machine, then I used superglue and an accelerator to glue my sheet of carbon fiber down to the fixture. After some magical programming and CNC work I was able to make a few really sweet inlays! There's a lot of tricks to doing it this way, and I was able to show and explain a bunch of them in the video. It's a fine balance between using enough glue and not enough, and getting the tolerances just right so that the inlays will fit perfectly into the handles with no unsightly gaps.

    Check out the next video, Week 67 - Inlays Part 2! In that vid I made some wood inlays and showed the gluing process in detail.

    Knives for Blade Show 2013

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    Come visit me at the worlds biggest knife show! Blade Show 2013 is being held in Atlanta, Georgia as always. If you've never felt one of my Norseman knives now is your chance, I'll have over 20 knives available for sale at table 17D. See you there!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 65 Going over finished Norseman Knives up close and personal

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    This week Erik and I sit down and show off all the hard work we've been doing for the past few months. The knives are finally coming together and they look incredible! From this batch of 65 we have 22 that are completely done and ready to ship, with the rest not too far behind. We take a close look at each knife and show the colors and details that make them so special. We have attained a high level of precision over the entire batch, and it really shows when you get them all finished and lined up side by side. Enjoy!

    Etching Damascus knife blades

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    For this webisode we are etching 3 damascus knife blades and 4 clips. These are made from Swedish Damasteel, a very high quality steel that I really enjoy working with. The video shows the process we used to mask off the important areas, what acids we used, and how we did it. We started out using Ferric Chloride, but for this steel I didn't like it at all. We've used Muriatic Acid in the past with great results, but we settled on using Sulfuric Acid, aka battery acid.

    14:36 has the best shot of the finished blades, they look incredible!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 64 Torx milling, lots of Norseman knives

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    This week we're getting a lot more knives put together! Erik starts out by showing a bunch of the awesome anodizing he's been up to.

    By 3:30 he works on a bunch of neat little titanium bits. These are the lock stops that we're using on our knives, they're a variation of the Hinderer Lockbar Stabilizer, which we're using under license from them. But our version is way cooler. For this part of the job he's got them set up in softjaws in a vise and is milling a teensy tiny Torx T9 pattern into the head with a 0.022" endmill (it's so tiny!). Then he uses a drag engraver to write some text on top. These are smaller than a dime.

    At 7:30 John goes over a bunch of the knives nearing completion and shows them in detail. The accuracy and tolerances on this batch is just wonderful, which allows some cool anodizing tricks.

    By 11:00 John starts engraving all the blades with the steel type and individual serial number. First he uses the digital probe to measure the exact location of each and every blade, ensuring a perfect engraving depth. Then he engraves them with a 2L engraving endmill. These blades are hard at 60.5 rockwell C, so they wear out tools fairly quickly. But the engravings are so shiny!

    At 13:09 John finally starts making the new thumbstuds. This is the last component that has to be made in order to finish this batch of knives. They're made fairly unconventionally, from a sheet of titanium instead of from round stock, but the results are worth it because they are absolutely perfect.

    Thanks for watching!

    CNC Titanium knife spacers

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    In this video I share how I make the titanium threaded spacers that I use to make my pocket knives. Normally a part like this would be made on a CNC lathe, but I don't have a good one so I tackled the job on my Tormach PCNC 1100 milling machine. The parts are tiny, so this was a very tricky job, but the results were worth it! Each one is exactly the same width, which is very important for my knives. Plus, I just love machining titanium.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 63 Finished Norseman and more blades

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    We're finally getting to the point in this batch of Norseman knives where we're able to start assembling knives and getting them set up properly. Still a lot of little things left on the to-do list, but it's getting smaller every day. In this video I was able to put together a really cool blue stonewashed knife and play with it for a while, I love it! Everything is finally coming together so nicely.

    At 4:08 Erik shows off his mad disc sanding skills for getting the titanium handles scratch free and super duper shiny!

    At 6:30 I explain two different types of cutting tools that I tried for machining the bevels of my blades. At this point the RWL34 blades have been heat treated to 60.5 Rockwell C, so machining them is bound to be tricky and wear out tools quickly. However, I finally found a combination of settings and tools that gives me an acceptable tool life and a great surface finish.

    By 15:22 I go back to that first blue knife and tweak it some more. I take the knife apart and you get to see how it works inside and how I "set" everything so that it flips out as fast as possible.

    Thanks for watching! If you would like to get in line for the next batch of Norseman knives just send me an e-mail to JohnGrimsmo (at) Gmail.com. Eta for those is July 2013, the list is almost full already!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 62 Blades and updates

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    The third run of Norseman knives is almost finished! In this video we do a lot of finishing work to the blades, handles and clips. I made a bunch of special clamps to hold down my blades while machining them. I also showed off one of my special lefty Norseman knives, turned out great!

    Lots of cool shots of machining things on the Tormach 1100, some 4140 steel clamps, reaming and machining hardened RWL34 stainless blade steel at 60.5 rockwell, and drilling and reaming some of our titanium pocket clips using a custom fixture and some Mitee Bite clamps.

    We're in production mode now so I don't have quite the time to film and edit videos that I usually do. Hope you enjoy it!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 61 - Production run handles

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    For week 61 we're focusing on machining the top side of all of our Norseman handles on the Tormach PCNC. We've got a few sweet patterns and designs to make and showcase in this video. I also go over the use and longevity of several endmills from www.LakeshoreCarbide.com, really impressed with these. I look at them real close with a loupe and a usb microscope, pretty neat.

    This week was all about production, and boy did we ever produce! We finished over 55 pairs of handles without any issues at all! And I only had to replace one endmill for that whole run, very impressed considering it's 6AL-4V aircraft grade titanium.

    Enjoy the video, please post a comment with your thoughts!

    Knifemaking Tuesday Week 60 - Pocket clips

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    60 weeks, WOW! This week I finish up machining the backside of all my handles and finish all the pocket clips. My Norseman knives are coming together nicely. The whole project has dragged on a lot longer than I wanted it to, but the parts are turning out so nice that it's been worth the wait.

    I finally nailed down how to threadmill titanium, if you've been following my videos you know that I've been having lots of trouble with that. But now I got about 500 4-40 holes threaded with one endmill, that's excellent. These LakeshoreCarbide threadmills rock! And you can't beat the price, anywhere.

    At 6:00 I talk about how nice it is to wear out endmills as opposed to breaking them prematurely, and I go through how I check them and change them when necessary. The name of the game with CNC is consistency and reliability.

    At 16:15 I've got my vacuum table from Mitee Bite set up with a huge sheet of titanium sucked down to it, this worked GREAT. It lets me machine a whole bunch of operations on the backside of my handles without a single clamping change, and swapping to a new sheet takes seconds. Also, it has eliminated my waterjet costs because now I can work with large sheets of metal, I don't need them to be chopped down.

    22:50 is where the pocket clip action starts. I already machined all the backside of the pocket clips in earlier operations, so this shows how I fixture and machine the top sides. After some tweaking and testing they went very smoothly and turned out GREAT. I enlarged the new logo a bit to fill the clip better, it looks soooo good. We finished up the 4 stainless damascus clips too, epic.

    Thanks for watching!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 59 - Handles

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    This week we worked on our new titanium Norseman handles. Since doing the last batch of knives, I've made quite a few subtle but effective changes to the design and to the way they are machined. For the first few batches of knives I was getting all the handles waterjet cut, which is a common and very good way to turn a huge sheet of metal into usable parts. But now that I have the Mitee Bite VacMagic vacuum table I am able to suck down a whole sheet and machine 9 pairs of handles and a bunch of clips in one go. But that's for next week. This week I'm going through my old inventory of waterjet handles and making them with the new design, so I made a quickie fixture to do one pair at a time.

    There are a ton of machining operations on the backside of my handles, more than most other knifemakers I'm sure. Very complicated and time consuming but I'm really happy with how they're turning out. One of the big tricky things is threadmilling the handles and clips, it's like tapping, but better because you can tap right to the bottom of a blind hole. And since my handles are so relatively thin, and I don't want the holes to go through, this is the way that made sense.

    Enjoy the video, lots more to come over the next few weeks while we're finishing up this batch of knives!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 58 - Norseman update

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    At Grimsmo Knives we're deep into our next batch of Norseman folders, finishing up the blades in this video.
    www.GrimsmoKnives.com

    I didn't have a lot of time to film this week so I'll admit that the video is mostly shop rambling, but sometimes that's fun to watch too. I got a cool new air compressor that I'm pretty excited about. I also got to make some really awesome damascus blades and pocket clips from a billet of Swedish Damasteel. Working with stainless damascus adds a bit of complexity because the material costs almost 10x what my normal stainless steel costs, so I want to make good use out of every possible piece. Waterjet would work great, but I wanted to machine everything myself for this batch. I was able to squeeze 3 blades, 4 pocket clips, and 11 thumb studs out of one small billet, not bad!

    Next week we'll be making our new titanium handles and pocket clips for these knives, stay tuned!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 57 - Norseman Blades and fixtures

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    We're making fixtures and Norseman knife blades this week!
    www.GrimsmoKnives.com

    Our long awaited third batch of Norseman knives is finally under way! For this week's video I made a few new blades to test out all the changes I've been making to the design over the past few months. All new fixtures, all new CNC code, as well as some subtle yet wonderful design changes.

    The first few minutes show how I made 6 new fixtures from 3/4" 6061 aluminum, 18" wide by 12" tall. I held them down to my vacuum table and faced them all with Tormach's Superfly facemill. Doing them all back to back ensured that they were all exactly the same thickness, making pallet changes easy and repeatable. I also bored 18mm holes in the back of each pallet so that I could press in the 12mm bushings that align to the VacMagic vacuum pallet changer. Then I flipped them and faced the top side to a thickness of 0.700. I also made a new vacuum grid plate that's 18x12, to go along with the 14"x14" one that I have. My table travel is 18"x10", so I like having a vacuum grid fixture that's the same size as my travel, it lets me maximize the table space.

    In this video I show a lot of cool endmills for cutting out the blades, how they're being used, as well as closeups with descriptions. Almost all of the endmills that I use these days are from www.LakeshoreCarbide.com. I even had one custom made for a specific purpose! I show closeups of their rougher, finisher, and my custom endmill, as well as all of them being used on my blades.

    The first blade had a few minor issues, no biggie, I changed the code a bit and ran a second blade. The second one turned out great except for one minor problem, the corner rounder went too deep. Again, no biggie, easy fix. Now after a few more changes I'm ready to run an entire pallet of 12 blades. We're making 65 knives in this batch, so we're going to be busy!

    Thank you for watching, and I will try to get the videos back onto a more regular schedule. It's not easy, this 25 minute video took me 4 hours to edit!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 56 - Grinder part 1

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    This Tuesday we started working on our new 2x72" belt grinder! There are a lot of aluminum plates and brackets to machine, some can be drilled manually and others should be CNC machined, so we did a bit of both for this video. Erik took the reins and did most of the work, getting some good progress done on the grinder. For the CNC portion we used a high speed milling technique so that we could cut 0.48" deep in one pass, using a LakeShore Carbide 2 flute uncoated endmill. It throws nice long shiny chips really far! We held the aluminum piece down on our VacMagic, but we needed a bit more clamping force because the tool paths were pretty aggressive, so we simply added a few extra clamps. Once it was done Erik simply cleaned up the holes and sanded the edges.

    For part 2 we'll hopefully get more of the parts made and start putting them together so that it begins to resemble an actual grinder.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 55 - Threadmilling fail

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    This week Erik and I started prototyping a new lock stabilizer device for our Norseman knives, this is a variant of the Rick Hinderer LBS. It's the same basic concept except machined from one solid piece of titanium instead of using a disc and a screw. We're attempting to make a round part (ideal for lathe) on my Tormach milling machine. This allows us to use a scrap piece of titanium sheet metal clamped to our Mitee Bite vacuum fixture.
    The second machining operation was a process called threadmilling, where we use a special endmill to cut threads on the outside of a shaft or on the inside of a hole. We failed with epic fashion, breaking yet another expensive 4-40 threadmill. It's a wonderful process, in theory, because you can tweak the code and make threads that are slightly bigger or smaller for a better fit, and you can make really weird threads very easily if you need to. Also you can thread blind holes all the way to the bottom, or in this case a shaft all the way to the base.

    For the machining guys here's some info: www.LakeShoreCarbide.com 4-40 threadmill which is 0.085" diameter, 0.18" long, 2 flutes. 2000rpm 2ipm, doing 4 passes, it broke on the second pass. Material is 6AL-4V titanium and the nub was 0.112" dia. I was external threadmilling via climb milling, which goes top to bottom. Air blast was on, but no coolant. ANY info or help would be very appreciated. I have a LOT of threadmilling to do in the near future so I want to get this right.

    Stay tuned next week where we hopefully fix this problem and finish the new component. Thanks for watching!

    www.GrimsmoKnives.com

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 54 - Tor knives

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    This week we're making our Tor fixed blade knives! It's been fun to utilize our new ATC for the mill as well as the VM300 vacuum fixturing pallet. Making these blades has had a few challenges, which I've shown in the video, mostly due to vibration and chatter when facing them.

    At 6:55 I show a really sweet machining operation where I use a 3/16" 4flute stub endmill from LakeShoreCarbide.com to make some lightweight pockets in the blade. This cut is full depth at 0.185" with a 0.025" stepover, 4000rpm and 50ipm! It's just flying right along, so much fun to watch. The chips aren't quite blue but I got them to a nice straw color. The air blast helps a LOT to keep the chips out of the way.

    After 11:11 I show the G10 handles we made in all different colors.

    Thanks for watching! Be sure to check out our website www.GrimsmoKnives.com and sign up for our newsletter to get new product announcements!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 53 - ATC and other new tools

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    This week we got to unbox a ton of new tools for the shop, handy that it falls right around Christmas! We finally bought a Tormach Automatic Tool Changer, fog buster, superfly flycutter, more toolholders, a large Evenheat heat treating oven, many parts from USAKnifeMaker for making our new grinder, tons of new titanium, some Timascus from Alpha Knife Supply, and lots more!

    In this vid we're basically giddy schoolgirls on Christmas opening up all these packages and getting excited about using these tools. The last 5 minutes shows us installing and using the Automatic Tool Changer.

    Thanks for watching!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 52 - Vacuum Fixture and G10 inlays

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    Merry Christmas! This week for KMT I got a bunch of new toys for the shop, including a new Sony video camera, an LED video light, and a wicked awesome VM300 vacuum pallet system from Mitee Bite to use on my Tormach CNC milling machine. Throughout the video I explain how the vacuum system works, how I will be using it, and then I make several parts with it. First up is a small aluminum fixture, then I interpolate some holes into G10 and threadmill them using a 4-40 thread-mill from www.LakeShoreCarbide.com. After that I flip the G10 over, screw it to the aluminum fixture, then profile and corner round it. This relatively small fixture lets me make 85 inlays at a time from a single sheet of G10!

    Enjoy the video and have a happy holiday season!

    John
    www.GrimsmoKnives.com
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com/newsletter.htm

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 51 - Designing my Integral knife

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    This week I show you the process I use to design a new knife in CAD. Since everything I do revolves around CNC machining, it all has to start in CAD.
    www.GrimsmoKnives.com
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com/newsletter.htm

    The new knife I'm designing doesn't have a name yet, but for now I'm calling it the Integral because that's what it is, the handle will be made from one solid piece of titanium. It's an exciting project, integral knives have a very cool aura around them because they're relatively simple but extremely complicated to pull off. It will be noticeably smaller than my Norseman knife, with it's blade length coming in at 3". My goal is to make it an awesome little EDC knife (Every Day Carry). The Norseman is fun but definitely on the large side.

    To design the knife I often start with what I know, and that's my previous designs. I'm not the kind of guy that can just sit down and draw 100 designs, I like to find something cool and completely change it until I like it. This video shows the process of how I do that, how I tweak the general shape of the handles or blade, how I contour them, how I do a swept cut for the edge bevels, etc. It's fun geeky stuff, and I'm really glad to have all you guys along for the journey!

    Thanks for watching!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 50 - Project updates

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    Wow 50 weeks already! Time flies. This week I'm pretty sick with the flu so I wasn't in the shop much to film a "cool" video, so I decided to give you guys an idea what sort of upcoming projects we have going on. First up I'm finishing our Tor knives, the 8" fixed blade that we're making. The handles are done and I'm making the blades soon. Then later in December we're going to be working on a batch of 50 Norseman knives! Very excited for that.

    Because we have all this production going on I don't want to bore you guys with showing the same type of footage week after week, so I want to bring "Knifemaking Tuesdays" back to the core element behind the idea... Take one day a week and work on something cool and interesting. I'm going to devote my tuesdays to fun projects, prototype work, new knife design, tool building, shop tours, etc. I think it'll be really fun!

    I've got a new knife idea in mind that will have an integral handle, meaning it's made from one solid piece of titanium instead of two with a bunch of screws. To do that I had a custom slitting saw made from www.LakeShoreCarbide.com, this will make the job considerably easier. I'm super duper excited for this project, been wanting to make an integral for a long time now.

    I'm also starting to build a 2x72 belt grinder! It's going to be a very fun project that will make for perfect "tuesday" footage.

    Thanks for watching!
    http://www.GrimsmoKnives.com
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  • PCNC 1100- Tormach Customer Showcase: John Grimsmo Knives

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    Tormach Customer Showcase Stories- John Grimsmo Knives: http://goo.gl/GVdz0
    Tormach CNC Workshops: http://goo.gl/tORPg
    The faces behind the camera on Knifemaking Tuesdays—a weekly video documentary series on You Tube—brothers John and Erik Grimsmo were at Tormach in the beginning of November 2012 to lead the first CNC Knifemaking Workshop. Carving out a few minutes of their trip to reflect on the past year, we asked the brothers to talk about their journey so far.

    Titanium Para2 handles!

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    Titanium handles for the Spyderco Paramilitary 2. 6AL-4V aircraft grade titanium, CNC machined to absolute perfection, and professionally stonewashed for that beautiful luster. $205 USD shipped worldwide. The first set I made felt a little heavy, so I made them significantly lighter by removing material underneath the liner inside the handle. Just doing this saved an entire ounce of weight, now they're barely heavier than the G10 ones. Except they're made from super awesome titanium. Say it slowly and try not to grin. Tiiitaaaaaaniiiiiiummmmmmm.

    These handles are now in stock and available for immediate purchase on our website, but they won't last long!
    http://www.grimsmoknives.com/custom-scales/spyderco/paramilitary-2-scales/

    Also sign up for our newsletter to get first crack at products like these!
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  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 49 - Eagle Scout engraving

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    I show how I engraved an Eagle Scout logo onto two of my early Norseman knives.
    www.GrimsmoKnives.com
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com/newsletter.htm

    This was really fun to do! All throughout my teens I was in the Boy Scouts of America, it was a pretty huge part of my life, and by the time I turned 18 I had achieved the rank of Eagle Scout, the top honor. Boy Scouts (and my uncle) brought me into the world of pocket knives, and from the age of 11 I carried one every single day.

    A customer of mine bought two early Norseman Knives, one for his son as an Eagle Scout gift, and one for himself. We chatted and he requested that I engraved the Eagle logo onto the handle of both knives. Because I always like to make things more complicated and awesome than they need to be, I decided to do a pretty fancy engraving and make it multiple colors! Since the knives are already finished and pretty, I used Dykem to mask the original color so that it would not be affected by the new engraving and anodizing process. Dykem worked pretty well as a masking agent as long as it's laid on thick and the metal is REALLY clean! Otherwise the anodizing leaked through. This engraving process took several hours to complete but it was a lot of fun, and the results were definitely worth it.

    Thanks for watching!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 48 - Vertical Lathe

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    This week I put together an interesting video on how to convert a milling machine into a lathe. http://www.GrimsmoKnives.com
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    Often times I have to machine small round objects and my old lathe is not very accurate. By holding several turning tools in a "gang tooling block", it's like having a CNC lathe with an automatic tool changer! This method is well suited for smaller material up to 3/4", because you can hold it in an R8 collet. To hold bigger stuff you can make an adapter to attach a small 3-jaw chuck to the spindle.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 47 - At Tormach CNC Workshop

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    This week was a REALLY fun one! Erik and I got to fly to Wisconsin and spend the week at Tormach's facility to teach a class on CNC knifemaking.
    www.GrimsmoKnives.com
    www.Tormach.com

    We had 5 people attend the class which turned out to be the perfect size, not too big, not too small. The goal of the class was to get the students comfortable using the Tormach CNC machinery to make a fixed blade knife called The Tor. Each day we worked on several different projects and taught a wide array of machining skills, starting with fixturing tips and tricks, flycutting steel, milling, pocketing, chamfering, heat treating, quenching, tempering, hard milling, sharpening, 3D milling G10 handles, and much much more.

    The class was a resounding success! Erik and I had a blast, the students loved every minute, and Tormach was extremely pleased as well. We are planning on holding similar classes in the spring/summer of 2013, contact me or Tormach directly for more info.

    Check us out on Facebook!
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    Sign up for our newsletter!
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    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 44 - machining Tor fixture

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    This week we're getting ready for our Tor knife, the fixed blade that we're making for the Tormach class in November. We'll be teaching a class of 10 people how to make this knife via CNC and how awesome and fun it is! More info on the class here:
    http://www.tormach.com/workshops.html

    Be sure to sign up for our brand new newsletter, aside from youtube this is where we will unveil our new products and keep you informed to what's in stock and what's coming soon.
    http://www.johngrimsmo.com/newsletter.htm

    Like us on Facebook!
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    The first part of the video introduces my ideas for the fixture that I need to build, as well as talking about the fasteners that I'll be using for this knife. The best ones I found were from www.monkeyedge.com!

    Then I go over the blade steel choice, I will be using 5160 spring steel for these knives, it's a great steel that fits this project perfectly. I also have to figure out how to mill it down to the right thickness because it's way too thick to start out with.

    At 13:05 I show some MiteeBite clamps and try to explain how they will work and how awesome they are.

    At 16:12 I start making the thick steel fixture for the Tor, after getting it all set up I go through a series of spotting, drilling, milling, pocketing, and chamfering operations. Tons of work, only to find out at the end that I drilled 4 of the holes too large and the whole thing is now scrap metal. Fun!

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 46 - Tor prototypes and prepping for Tormach Workshop

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    http://www.GrimsmoKnives.com
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    This week was spent preparing for our upcoming Tormach workshop about CNC knifemaking. I made 2 more fixed blade knives and was able to fine tune my process and G-code to the point where I'm happy with it and there are no mistakes.

    At 7:40 I start facemilling the blades to the proper thickness. When I buy the raw material it's a lot thicker than I want so this was my solution, it works quite well! Obviously, surface grinding is a much more common solution, but I don't have one, and I wanted to show this process in the class.

    At 8:42 I flipped the blade, faced the other side, then started milling the edge bevel.

    At 9:35 Erik and I started machining a pair if green G10 handles, including profiling the outside shape and then 3D milling the contour. This process is fun to watch in the shop, seeing a chunk of raw material turn into an intricate 3D shape.

    At 10:22 until the end is a wrap up and an explanation of what tools I'll be bringing with me to the workshop. We're really excited!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 45 - Tor handles and blades

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    With 2 weeks to go until the Tormach CNC workshop that we're teaching, we have a lot of little things to finish up and streamline. In this video I finish up the steel fixture that we're using, make a set of 3D machined aluminum handles, then a set of Micarta handles, then a finished blade!

    I want to thank everyone for watching, and remind you to check out our sites!
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    The first 8 minutes are spent fixing and finishing the fixture that I made in Week 44, I had to face it down again, engrave it again, and ovalize the main clamping holes.

    During 8 minutes to 20 minutes I go through the process of making my first set of 3D machined handles out of aluminum. I immediately broke a tool, a 1/4" ballmill, due to some dumb choices and settings on my part. Lesson learned, I fixed it for next time. This segment shows in detail some of the profiling operations used to make the handle look like a handle instead of a rectangle, as well as how cool the 3D pattern looks. I love machining intricate stuff like this and can't wait to do more of it!

    20-28 minutes were spent making another set of handles out of Micarta, with several improvements to the code. These worked out very well and look freakin amazing! I've never worked with Micarta before, but I love it.

    The last segment of the video goes over making the first blade out of some basic 1018 steel from the local metal store. I don't plan on heat treating it or even using it as a knife, this was just proof of concept. I learned plenty of mistakes in this process, which will make the next blade go smoother and hopefully look nicer too.

  • Norseman knives available - and handles too!

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    I've got 6 Norseman custom knives available for immediate sale, as well as many pairs of handles! Send me an e-mail to JohnGrimsmo (at) gmail (dot) com to order!!!

    By the way, this is probably the most ridiculous video I've ever done, it was hilarious to film and edit, we had a blast.

    Knife Show - USN G4 Vegas 2012

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    On Aug 31, 2012 Erik and I flew to Las Vegas for an awesome annual knife show, the 4th USN Gathering. I went last year to G3 and once you go, you already know you're going to the next one. We had such an amazing time, met a ton of great people, and best of all got some amazing advice and feedback on our knives. Because of the tips we learned our knives will step up to a new level. We were only there for about 48 hours so it was a whirlwind trip, with crazy long travel times of 18 hours each way (layover flights, etc). We were also up for about 42 hours straight before finally crashing in our hotel room on the first night. But Vegas does that to you.

    As you'll see in the video, there were SO many cool knives and toys to see at the show, tons of stuff I've never seen before and lots of stuff I want. Hope you enjoy it! Thanks for watching.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 43 - The Tor, etching blades

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    This week for Knifemaking Tuesday we reveal a new project. We are building a fixed blade knife, calling it The Tor, and best of all we get the opportunity to teach a class of students how to build it too!

    http://www.tormach.com/blog/?p=3370&utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=new-knifemaking-workshop-for-cnc

    On November 6-9, 2012, Erik and I will be flying to Waunakee Wisconsin to the Tormach headquarters where we will be leading a workshop on CNC knifemaking. It will be a 3.5 day workshop open to 10 students. The specialty course is designed for CNC enthusiasts with a special interest in the craft of making high-end custom knives. We will be using Tormach's full machining facility as a classroom and will build 10 Tor knives, one for each student. All components will be CNC machined as much as possible, and the participants will operate the machinery under our instruction. It's going to be a lot of fun and we're very excited to have this opportunity. If you've watched any of my videos you know that I really enjoy sharing my knowledge with the world, and this will be an excellent way to give hands on training.

    The next several weeks of KMT will feature the development and prototyping of The Tor, so that we have everything ready for the class in November.

    At 7:48 in the video Erik explains how he used Ferric Chloride to etch some of our stainless steel blades and then did the "poor man's stonewash" to make them look really cool and rugged.

    Thanks for watching!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 42 - knives for USN show

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    This week was spent frantically getting ready for the upcoming knife show in Las Vegas. I start out by making more pocket clips and showing the process involved with that.

    At 7:18 I show a lot of the endmills that I use to machine everything and describe where I get them from, mostly www.LakeShoreCarbide.com these days because their prices and selection are the best. I also get engraving endmills from www.2Linc.com and am very happy with those as well.

    By 12:38 I start making more titanium handles for my Norseman knives. I am able to set up 17 handles in one fixturing, which is very awesome. Drilling, engraving, contouring, profiling, etc.

    15:45 is where Erik starts sanding and deburring the handles to remove any sharp edges and to eliminate any endmill chatter and turn the edges into nice shiny pretty things to look at and feel.

    18:12 shows two extremely sleepy Grimsmos trying to keep going and finish up. I show the tumbled handles and blades to see how cool they look up close.

    21.57 Erik shows us some of the anodizing work that he did, he got some really awesome greens, blues, purples, and bronzes. I love anodizing titanium!!!

    23:17 I show how I machine the lockbar in order to "fit" the lockup of every knife, this is a slightly time consuming process but usually leads to rock solid lockup exactly where I want it.

    By 25:20 I cut to after the show is over and give a general description of how awesome it was and how much we learned. In talking with other knifemakers we learned several things to improve on our knives to make them even better, smoother, and more consistent.

    At 28:41 I show that the blade is off center and then proceed to take the knife apart and show why, turns out the bearing pockets are not flat and square, so the bearings just aren't sitting flat. I figured out a way to clamp them on my mill and re-machine those pockets to fix them, which luckily worked out perfect! Now the blades are dead center and even smoother than before.

    At 45:00 I show the new t-shirts that we got! These are really cool, I'm very happy with how they turned out. They will be $20 in person or $25 shipped, please e-mail me at JohnGrimsmo (at) Gmail (dot) com for more info or to order.

    Thanks for watching!
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 41 - More blades, sanding, ceramic detent

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    Hey guys! This week we're working hard at getting the second batch of blades done. I start off the vid machining the bevels of a batch of blades on the Tormach. Then at 3:07 Erik puts on the GoPro chest mount and starts shortening a bunch of pivot pins on our lathe, it's a CNC lathe but he's using it manually by manipulating the keyboard. By 4:36 we're back on the mill machining more blades, this time pre-reaming the pivot holes using 0.181" pre-ream endmills from LakeShoreCarbide.com, they're awesome! Then we use a carbide reamer to open them up to 0.1875. GoPro mounted on the spindle head makes awesome shots, but the low light ruins them, sorry!

    At 8:44 Erik, Clara and I head to our dad's house for a nice dinner, and Erik gets to use his Norseman to slice up a bunch of chicken and grilled veggies. It's very rewarding to be able to use a knife that WE made in day to day activities. I also slice a croissant in half very easily.

    At 12:47 I describe and start designing a blade holding jig to make grinding the flats on the disc sander easier. From 15:11 - 22:34 I use Solidworks and Solidcam to design the jig, then directly after that Erik showed me a simple way to accomplish the same task very easily.... Punk.

    At 25.33 I showed how I had one detent ball crack into pieces, so I had to replace it. I chose to replace it with a ceramic ball instead of 52100 hardened steel, and I LOVE the results!!

    Thanks for watching and subscribing!
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

    JGK knife gathering and BBQ - August 2012

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    Erik and I hosted an awesome knife gathering and BBQ at my house last weekend, we had about 30 people and everyone had a blast! A lot of USN members, as well as several of our customers came to visit, all from the greater Toronto area. The day was like a giant festival of awesome knife stuff, so many cool toys! I got to see a lot of knives that I've never seen or held before, so I was able to learned a few things and drool over many things. It's a big kid show and tell, with sharp stuff!

    Thanks for watching,
    John
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 40 - Phase one complete

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    It's been 40 weeks! Wow how time flies. This video brings to a close phase one of this project, getting the first batch of awesome finished knives out the door to their eager new owners. It's a wrap up of what the Knifemaking Tuesday project has meant to us, Erik and I sit down and have a good long chat detailing the experience and things that we've learned. The support from you guys has been incredible, and we can't thank you enough!

    From here on out, Knifemaking Tuesday will continue to show fun and exciting knife stuff, whether we are producing another batch of knives, prototyping a new design, learning new methods of machining and grinding, or tours at various other shops. We will always strive to fill the videos with interesting things.

    THANKS FOR WATCHING!!!

    Here are some reviews from other youtubers who have received their Norseman already:
    Jdavis882:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-o4qtBOVSE
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dgf1yiKvkpc
    Nubo32:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSq4BKd3EXE
    WeaversofEternity:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCvmXqqvefU
    jdthesaint1:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6T9Wh_D1xQE

    -John and Erik Grimsmo
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 39 - polishing, sharpening, custom stop pins

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    For week 39 Erik and I were busy anodizing lots of knives, experimenting with new colors and with the Multi-Etch chemical. At the 8:00 minute mark I show how I used a propane blowtorch to heat anodize a set of handles, you can get some REALLY cool colors and patterns with this method.
    At 14:28 we do a nice long segment on using our 6" 3M Scotchbrite wheel that we purchased from www.knifemaking.com, it's awesome! This thing deburrs everything and smooths and polishes titanium and blade steel like no other. It leaves an amazing surface finish and smooths out all the milling marks. It's a huge asset to our shop. Erik even goes into detail about how to get a sweet "orange peel" surface finish, which happens when the titanium gets a little hot and starts to smear, when done properly it looks very tasty.
    22:13 is where Erik goes into detail about using our Wicked Edge knife sharpening system. It's a very sweet system that comes with many different stones and allows you to upgrade to very very high grit stones and leather strops with diamond lapping compound. With some practice you can achieve mirror polished edges with perfectly flat bevels. We love the wicked edge, but it is very time consuming.
    At 37:20 I show and describe how I am making custom stop pins to fix a few knives that lock up way too far, I goofed up on a few of them so this is a great way to save them. I was able to use my Tormach mill set up as a lathe to make them out of 17-4PH stainless steel, really good stuff. I've got another video coming out soon that goes into detail about using the mill as a lathe.

    I hope you enjoyed this weeks video, we filmed a ton of stuff and editing took forever :-)

    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 38 - Anodizing and fixing warped blades

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    This week we're rounding the last few corners for finishing up the first batch of knives and even got some of them shipped! In the first half of the video I start by upgrading my titanium anodizing tank into something nicer and bigger, using a titanium cathode instead of aluminum. Then at 5:25 I show how I can test out colors without committing the entire part to a certain color. After that I go through the voltage ranges on a piece of sandblasted titanium, which doesn't show colors nearly as brightly as shiny Ti.

    At 12:39 I show the finished knife in two tone, the honeycomb pockets are a muted dark green and then we polished the flats and all the edges, anodized the top face blue, then polished the edges again! The end result looks incredible.

    At 14:46 I explain why warped blades bug me like crazy. With the method I chose to make these blades it leaves the possibility that some will warp in the final machining process, so I had 4 blades that were off center. Now this isn't something you can fix by messing with the pivot pin tightness, the blade actually has a slight curve to it and one or two of them were rubbing the side. To fix that I was able to re-machine one side and relieve some stresses in the blade, bringing it closer to center and making it straighter. Not perfect, but acceptable. I've got some ideas for the next run that will hopefully make things more reliable.

    Thanks for watching!
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 37 - lock angle, custom stop pin, rants

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    For week 37 Erik and I are hard at work getting the last few things on this batch of knives perfect. One thing we've been having troubles with is sticky locks and incorrect lock geometries, so in this video I get that all straightened out. Using a digital angle gauge I found that my blades were currently set to 5.5°, not the 7° I thought, so I had to re-machine all lock tangs for a new angle. We worked through a lightning storm and lost power a few times, once for several hours, and I explain how that can be unpredictable on home shop CNC equipment. Then Erik cut himself, on a DULL blade.

    Next up at 11:48, in order to save a few knives that lock up too far, I wanted to make some stop pins that were a few thousandths of an inch larger, turned out to be a MUCH harder job than I thought it would be. It wouldn't be so hard if I was using stainless steel, but I didn't have any, so I tried to turn hardened steel pins and it drove me nuts!

    At 21:16 Erik took official delivery of his first finished Norseman! He loves it, can't wait to start carrying it daily. The rest of the vid is just us ranting and raving about the knives and the work we've done and still have to do.

    Thanks for watching!
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 36 - setting detent, lockup, finishing

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    This week we got several steps closer to finishing this batch of knives. Starting with engraving serial numbers on each and every one, then I moved on to showing how I drill the hole for the detent ball into the blade. The detent hole has to be in the exact right position and tuned properly for the knife to flip out strong and fast every time, so I have come up with a way to fine tune the hole position using the accuracy of my Tormach. You get to see some of the knives coming apart and going together a dozen times, there is a LOT of test fitting involved in making such a high end knife. Next up I have to modify all the Alpha Knife Supply pivot pins that I use, the head is way too tall for my liking, so each one gets shortened and turned down to a nice low profile dome. Starting at 34:45 I'm using my Tormach mill set up as a lathe, so instead of holding a tool in the spindle it holds the workpiece and moves it into some turning tools that I have clamped into my vise. This is a pretty cool operation, it takes a lot of setup and tweaking to get it right, but after that it's very repeatable. After machining I show how I sand off the pip and scotchbrite the head of the pin to make it super smooth and shiny, this worked amazingly well. It turns out that the pins heat anodize very well too, low heat makes a really wicked bronze color and I think that higher heat will produce a blue/purple/blurple color. Erik tells us how he sands some of the blades down to a really nice handrubbed finish, going through a few grits and finishing with the scotchbrite wheel. The last thing I work on in this video is getting all the knives to lock up properly. All the lock tangs on the blades were cut last week, so this week I just had to mill a tiny bit off the end of the lockbar until it locks up perfectly. It took LOTS of test fitting. Then I carbidized the lockface to make it last a lot longer and not be so sticky. I've still got a few things to work out, but the knives are SO close!

    Next week we just have to finish getting them all to lock up, finish sanding and cleaning everything, anodize, and sharpen. YAY!

    Thank you all for your continued support!
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 35 - hardmilling blades and engraving

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    This week was spent hardmilling all the Norseman blades, engraving the logos, and starting assembly. I started out by testing a new machining theory that, in my head, seemed like an awesome idea, but in practice sucked big time. For the cutting edge on my knives I have chosen a 15° angle on each side, so I wanted to try using a 15° endmill to do it in one pass. Turns out the tool is actually called a 75° endmill. Doing it this way was very difficult to find the optimal depth of cut so that it gets the whole edge but doesn't undercut, basically it was a huge pain and it lead to a lot of edge chipping. I used a USB microscope to zoom in and see the edge at around 100x magnification. Next up we showed how we practically ruined a whole run of threaded spacers, then were able to fix them. We then realized that some of the handles weren't fitting together as perfectly as they need to. Turns out that something, somewhere, made a small mistake on a few of the handles, causing them to line up quite wrong when assembled. So Erik spent a few hours matching handles to ensure that every assembled knife fits perfectly. After ditching the 15° endmill idea I worked out the final bugs in my hardmilling code and show the entire process for that, including 7 tool changes. I explain how subroutines work and how excellent they are.
    I bought a bunch of cool new engraving endmills from www.2Linc.com, these things are sweet! I was previously using 1/16" 4flute ball endmills for all my engraving, but cutting into hardened stainless steel can be very difficult on a tool, and that ballmill has very little material at the very tip, so it kept shearing off. I've blown through 10 of them this month. It's nice to finally have PROPER engraving tools, and they work excellent. We wrap up by showing 13 knives being assembled, it's so cool to see them coming together!

    Thanks for watching!
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

  • Making a disc sander

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    This video is a start to finish look at how I made my disc sander from scratch. At first it sounded like a fairly easy project, but as things usually go, it took a lot longer than I was anticipating. The first thing I did was order a 1HP motor and GS2 VFD (variable frequency drive) from www.AutomationDirect.com, I was very pleased with their selection, pricing, and free shipping to Canada. After that I went ahead and started making my own sanding disc out of aluminum. I used a 10" x 10" plate of 1/4" aluminum and the hub was 2" dia x 2" long aluminum round bar. I got the idea from an article I read on CNCCookbook:
    http://www.cnccookbook.com/CCDiscSander.htm

    Using my Tormach milling machine I was able to mill the square plate into a round disc that is 8.75" diameter and drill a few bolt holes through the center. Then I drilled and tapped those holes into the hub. Once I got them bolted together I tried it out on the motor and noticed some serious vibration, no surprise because a 2 piece setup like this is not naturally balanced, or flat. So I chucked it up in my Grizzly G0602 lathe that I converted to CNC, even though I'm using it "manually" here. I turned down the OD a little bit to true it up, then tried facing the disc to make it flat. Due to the large diameter and thin stock, it chattered a LOT. Using a good insert definitely helped. Once I got it "good enough" I was able to make good use of the machine for a few weeks. I decided to get a proper disc from http://www.beaumontmetalworks.com/, it is totally worth the $83 they are asking! Once that came it, of course it worked great right away, then I had to make a sanding rest so that I can set my parts down on it while sanding. Using some old aluminum square bar I had laying around I was able to rig something up without too much time and effort spent.

    All in all, it works quite well. I probably spent $500 on stuff, Beaumont sells a finished unit for $890 that isn't a bad deal at all if you want a plug and play option, and their extra adjustable work rest looks awesome. But mine does exactly what I wanted it to do. Definitely takes some practice to make nice parts every time, but most tools require that.

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 34 - lock face and shortening screws

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    This week Erik and I have almost finished the first batch of Norseman knives, it's very exciting and we're having tons of fun. Erik starts out by making a bunch of threaded titanium spacers on the Tormach set up as a lathe. We didn't go into too much detail about that in this video, but check out week 30 for more detailed video of that. Next up I started cutting the lock tang for each blade using a fixture that I made and a 2" facemill. The blades are already hardened before doing this step. Each blade will get specifically fit to a set of handles and they will stay together forever. That's the only way to ensure proper lockup every time. Once that was done I moved onto shortening all the screws that bolt the knife together. I'm using really nice stainless steel screws but they're way too long, so the last half of the video shows my trials and tribulations for shortening them. I go over 3 different kinds of taps, taper hand tap, thread form tap, and thread mill, along with how to use (and break) each one. Eventually I was able to make the form tap work great, and I tapped over 80 holes into 1/8" stainless steel. After threading a bunch of screws into the plate I used a 1/4" endmill to chop them all down to size, it was a lot of work but it will really pay off down the road.

    Thanks for watching!
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 33 - Closeup shots and Fitting things

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    This week for Knifemaking Tuesdays Erik and I are finishing up the last little tweaks for our Norseman's and getting them to fit and work perfectly. There are lots of close up shots of the two prototypes for those of you who have been wanting to see them. We assembled and disassembled it many times while fitting things, so you can see how it all goes together. On the Tormach we machined the internal stop pin groove, the bearing races, and pre-reamed then reamed the pivot hole. Also you get to see how my pocket clips turned out, how they look in color and on the knife, as well as what they look like sticking out of my pocket. By the end of the video we figured out the formula of measurements to get the knife to flip out REALLY fast while being buttery smooth.

    Thanks for watching! Be sure to subscribe.

    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 31 - At Blade Show 2012

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    This week Knifemaking Tuesday was spent at Blade Show! Well, the actual tuesday consisted of us driving home, but the days prior were at the show. So I wanted to shoot a little bit of footage with other knifemakers and cool people to just chat and banter about the details of a good knife. I talked with JDavis882, Peter and Paul Rassenti, and a good long chunk at the end with Brad Southard. Brad has been helping me for months with the finer aspects of knifemaking, and here we talk about edge thickness, heat treat, and one of his customs called the Flippin Tanto. I wish I could have spent more time filming and talking with people, but being an exhibitor at this show is very busy, not a lot of free time.

    I also apologize that some of the footage is out of focus, that's what happens when you film with a DSLR camera and leave it on manual focus.

  • JGK At Blade Show 2012

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    Our quick video of the awesome trip we had down to Blade Show 2012. My brother, father and I drove down. We didn't get too much footage inside the show because we were just so busy taking care of our table and chatting with everyone. It was an amazing time and if you're a knife enthusiast I highly recommend going to the 2013 show! So many cool makers and ideas on display, plus everyone is so nice and friendly. Unfortunately we were only able to bring two prototype Norseman knives to have on display and let people touch and feel, so I know that we gave up a lot of impulse buys because of that. However everybody loved the knives and we got some wonderful constructive criticism from knifemakers WAY more experienced than us, tips that will make the next run go smoother and better.

    It was really sweet being "recognized" at the show, tons of people were coming up to us and introducing themselves because they knew us from watching our videos. Erik had 4 people recognize him coming in and out of the bathroom, no joke!

    Thanks for watching and for your continued support, I couldn't do this without you guys!

    I will upload another video from the show in the next few days, Knifemaking Tuesdays at Blade Show, and will link it here. Stay tuned!

    Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 30 - final work before Blade Show

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    This week was crazy busy, crunch time before Blade Show! We made LOTS of handles, LOTS of awesome 3d machined pocket clips and got our blades back from heat treat. Also I got to play with turning my Tormach mill into a lathe! Lots of headaches there. Gotta go, heading out the door to drive to Blade Show now!

  • Knifemaking Tuesday Week 29 - blade and handle machining

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    This week (sorry it's posted late!) was spent finishing up our run of 42 Norseman blades in RWL34 so that we could get them off to heat treat as soon as possible. Remember these blades are 100% CNC machined on my Tormach, so this video shows some of that process. We're using a toroid endmill that uses 2 button inserts, which works extraordinarily well for the edge grind area. Previously I was using a 1/4" ballmill, but this new tool rocks. This was my first test at playing with subroutines, that's writing code which repeats itself in different a different location. My first try I got it backwards. After machining all these blades and showing the various problems we were having, I was able to take them to the heat treating place. Erik then picked up our first Norseman prototype and sharpened it on the Wicked Edge knife sharpening system, it's awesomely sharp now, very cool to see. I've been carrying it and using it daily, I LOVE this knife!! Shortly thereafter I started working on the titanium handles for this knife, getting the g-code perfect and kink-free, which takes a long time and lots of trial and error.

    Blade Show is just a week away, and there is still a TON of work to do. With any luck we'll get at least a few knives finished, with lots of luck we'll get them all done! Thanks for watching.

    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

    Paramilitary 2 handles - DONE!

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    We finally have Spyderco Paramilitary 2 handles perfect!! This has been a long road, 9 months in the making. I have learned a lot about machining while working on this project, lots of failed attempts, lots of new fixturing techniques to provide repeatable results. Perfect parts every time, that's the goal. Just wait till these scales get anodized, they're going to look incredible.

    I am accepting orders NOW, send me an e-mail to johngrimsmo AT gmail DOT com.

    Para2 titanium handles are just around the corner and available for pre-order.

    Thanks for watching!
    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 28 - Blades! waterjet handles, blade fixture

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    This week I got to pick up even more cool stuff from the waterjet place, a ton of titanium handles! They also gave me a tour of the shop and let me shoot a bit of video, unfortunately not of knife stuff but of some other project they're working on. My brother Erik and I spent Tuesday and Wednesday finish up the huge fixture plate for making blades, and after a few huge goof ups it finally works. Setting it up on the Tormach we tested out the code for cutting one blade, making sure that it's perfect before we multiply it across the whole fixture and potentially screw up 12 blades. We made 3 test blades, all mostly good but with room for improvement. The new toroid endmill that we're using to create the edge geometry rocks the house! Leaves a super nice surface finish and removes a lot of material quickly. These blades are RWL34 Swedish stainless steel. Once we go through a few runs of handles then we can take them to heat treat this coming monday.

    Next week, heat treat, hard mill blades and engrave them, make titanium handles, make titanium spacers/thumbstuds.

    Blade Show starts 2 weeks from today, we're at table 20E. Be sure to stop by and say hi!

    Tormach - first steel machined part

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    This is footage from last week, it's the very first part I made on the new mill! I wanted to try something new, something that would prove the awesomeness of this machine, so I quickly designed a widgimadinger from 1018 cold rolled steel. A pointless object, it's sole purpose was to remove a LOT of material using a small endmill and a very deep depth of cut. I used a 1/4" 4 flute endmill with 0.79" flute length, 0.75" DOC, 1" of stickout from the holder. It sliced through this part like butter, shaving it away layer by layer. The operation produced some really neat long and thin chips. The surface finish could have been a little nicer, and there was a little bit of chatter in some spots. I'm wondering how much nicer it would look if I machined the same thing in stainless or a nice steel like 4140, I've only turned that one but it always leaves a wonderful surface finish while 1018 almost always looks like crap.

    Sooo, the machine is a success!! I would never have dreamed of doing a cut like that on my old Grizzly G8689 CNC conversion. And if I did, I would have stepped down 0.025" at a time and it would have taken forever. This part took 18 minutes.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 27 - waterjet blades and big fixtures

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    Hey guys, this past week was spent finishing up a lot of setup work on the new machine and getting more comfortable operating it. Although it is similar to our old cnc mill, it's quite a bit bigger and more powerful, much easier and faster to get into trouble. Broken a few endmills already haha. My brother Erik and I picked up 6 meters of RWL34 swedish stainless blade steel from world famous knifemaker Brian Tighe, then drove out to our local waterjet place to get them cut into Norseman Blades. Just received the blades a few days ago and they look tasty! Can't wait to start cutting into them. First thing we have to do is to make a large fixture plate so that we can bolt the blanks onto it for machining, this video shows a similar fixture being machined. I'm also waiting for a new tool to come in the mail that will allow me to make the blades even better and more efficiently, hopefully it comes this week.

    With any luck, next week's video will be action packed full of awesome machining and custom knife progress!

    Tormach - wiring and power drawbar

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    Here we are explaining the new wiring required in our garage to be able to feed the new Tormach with enough juice to be happy. We had the electrician come in and install a 60 amp breaker panel and run 5 new plugs. Two are dedicated for the machine, a 240v 20a circuit will power the machine and a 120v 15a circuit will power the computer and other accessories. Next we discuss the installation of our power drawbar, as well as the electronics that control the machine.

  • Tormach delivery, unboxing, and setup

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    Two weeks ago we received our new Tormach PCNC 1100 CNC milling machine, this vid shows how it was delivered and how excited we were to unbox it and find a place for it in the garage. Moving it around proved to be tricky but still do able using an automotive engine hoist, the mill weighs 1,200 lbs so it's no joke moving it. We decided to set up the stand first and space it about 2' from the wall, which was a great idea and gave us lots of clearance room behind. Eventually we were able to lift the mill and gently place it onto the stand without too much drama. Then we proceeded to use silicone caulking to seal the walls and splash trays to the base. If you're receiving delivery of one of these machines I hope something in here has helped you out, if not check out saunixcomp's videos! His install vids helped me out quite a bit.

    Tormach delivery in fast forward

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    Two weeks ago we got a new CNC milling machine, a Tormach PCNC 1100! This was shot with 1 frame per second over the course of 24 hours, and I edited out the boring bits to make it shorter. The first part of the vid shows the truck lowering the pallets and moving them into our garage, then us tearing the crates apart and removing the goodies. That night we were able to use an engine hoist to lift the 1,200 lb mill onto the stand, it was tricky! Not only did the hoist keep losing pressure but it was hard to get it high enough. Also, we had to space up the mill pallet 2" in order to get the hoist under it, and do the same to the stand. Eventually we got it placed onto the stand the same day we got it! The next day was spent with the electrician getting the whole garage re-wired, he installed a 60amp panel and ran 4 new plugs. 3 120v plugs and one 240v plug for the machine.

    Hope you enjoy the vid, the real time video is coming up next.

  • Knifemaking Tuesdays Week 26 - New Tormach CNC mill!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    I apologize for the lack of knifemaking videos the past 4 weeks, we've been really busy filling orders, designing all kinds of new stuff, ordering materials for the upcoming run of Norseman's, and getting a brand new milling machine! It's a Tormach PCNC 1100, and let me tell you, this thing is soooo amazingly amazing I can't even describe it. It will take our business to an entirely new level of production and accuracy. Tormach has also sponsored our youtube channel!

    In this video I just give a run down of the machine, let you know what we've been up to the past few weeks, and what is coming up in the next month. LOTS of work to do.

    Blade Show 2012 starts June 8th, we'll be at table 20E, make sure to stop by and say hi!!

    www.JohnGrimsmo.com

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